Topic: Healthy Eating

Coffee Chat: Advancing Equitable Access to Improved Nutrition: Evidence and Policy

Advancing Equitable Access to Improved Nutrition: Evidence and Policy

In this coffee chat hosted by the CHOICES Community of Practice, Sara Bleich, Professor of Public Health Policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and inaugural Vice Provost for Special Projects at Harvard University and Steve Gortmaker, Professor of the Practice of Health Sociology, Director of the Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity, and Director and Co-Principal Investigator of the CHOICES Project at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health shared evidence about cost-effective, population-level nutrition policies that have been shown to prevent obesity and improve health equity as well as updates about implementation.

View the resource round-up from this coffee chat

Download the April 2024 coffee chat presentation slides

Disclaimer: Our guest speakers share their own perspectives and do not speak for Harvard.

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Coffee Chat: State & Local Policies for Incorporating Added-Sugar Warning Labels on Restaurant Menus

State and Local Policies for Incorporating Added-Sugar Warning Labels on Restaurant Menus

In this coffee chat hosted by the CHOICES Community of Practice, DeAnna Nara, Senior Policy Associate at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, explored strategies to incorporate added-sugar warning labels into restaurant menus to reduce added sugar consumption and shared resources to support practitioners at the state and local levels with this work.

View the resource round-up from this coffee chat

Download the March 2024 coffee chat presentation slides

Disclaimer: Our guest speakers share their own perspectives and do not speak for Harvard.

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Coffee Chat: Exploring the Health Equity Benefits of Sugary Drink Excise Taxes

In this coffee chat hosted by the CHOICES Community of Practice, Matthew Lee, PhD Candidate from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and California native who has researched sugary drink trends and the impacts of sugary drink excise taxes in the San Francisco Bay Area, discusses insights from his recent study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that he led along with other researchers from the CHOICES Team. Matt also focuses on the ways in which these taxes, and the potential revenue raised from them, can benefit communities by improving health equity.

View the resource round-up from this coffee chat

Download the January 2024 coffee chat presentation slides

Disclaimer: Our guest speakers share their own perspectives and do not speak for Harvard.

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Cost-effectiveness of Improved WIC Food Package for Preventing Childhood Obesity

This study determines the cost-effectiveness of changes to WIC’s nutrition standards in 2009 for preventing obesity and to estimate impacts on socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequities.

Kenney EL, Lee MM, Barrett JL, Ward ZJ, Long MW, Cradock AL, Williams DR, Gortmaker SL. Cost-effectiveness of Improved WIC Food Package for Preventing Childhood Obesity. Pediatrics. 2024 Jan;153. doi: 10.1542/peds.2023-063182.

Abstract

Background & Objectives

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) prevents food insecurity and supports nutrition for more than 3 million low-income young children. Our objectives were to determine the cost-effectiveness of changes to WIC’s nutrition standards in 2009 for preventing obesity and to estimate impacts on socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequities.

Methods

We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis to estimate impacts from 2010 through 2019 of the 2009 WIC food package change on obesity risk for children aged 2 to 4 years participating in WIC. Microsimulation models estimated the cases of obesity prevented in 2019 and costs per quality-adjusted-life year gained.

Results

An estimated 14.0 million 2- to 4-year old US children (95% uncertainty interval (UI), 13.7–14.2 million) were reached by the updated WIC nutrition standards from 2010 through 2019. In 2019, an estimated 62 700 (95% UI, 53 900–71 100) cases of childhood obesity were prevented, entirely among children from households with low incomes, leading to improved health equity. The update was estimated to cost $10 600 per quality-adjusted-life year gained (95% UI, $9760–$11 700). If WIC had reached all eligible children, more than twice as many cases of childhood obesity would have been prevented.

Conclusions

Updates to WIC’s nutrition standards for young children in 2009 were estimated to be highly cost-effective for preventing childhood obesity and contributed to reducing socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequities in obesity prevalence. Improving nutrition policies for young children can be a sound public health investment; future research should explore how to improve access to them.


Funding

This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625 and K01DK125278), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose. The findings and conclusions are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or other funders.

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Strategy Report: New Opportunities for Healthy Afterschool Programs

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu for an accessible version of this report.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: New Opportunities for Healthy Afterschool Programs Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Dar Alon, Stella Zhu, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Stephanie McCulloch, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Fast-Food Restaurant Calorie Labeling (2018)

Fast-food restaurant menu board with calories labeled for each menu item

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu for an accessible version of this report.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Fast-Food Restaurant Calorie Labeling (2018) Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Stephanie McCulloch, Matt Lee, Zach Ward. We thank Jason Block at the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Harvard Medical School, for his guidance, leadership, and expertise on calorie labeling.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Creating Healthier Early Care and Education Environments

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu for an accessible version of this report.

Suggested Citation

Barrett JL, Bolton AA, Gortmaker SL, Cradock AL. CHOICES National Action Kit: Creating Healthier Early Care and Education Environments Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Dar Alon, Stella Zhu, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Stephanie McCulloch, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Reducing Exposure to Unhealthy Food and Beverage Advertising

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu for an accessible version of this report.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Reducing Exposure to Unhealthy Food and Beverage Advertising Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; November 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Banapsha Rahman, Ya Xuan Sun, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

← Back to Resources

Strategy Report: Creating Healthier Afterschool Environments

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu for an accessible version of this report.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Creating Healthier Afterschool Environments Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; November 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Dar Alon, Stella Zhu, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

← Back to Resources

Strategy Report: Sugary Drink Excise Tax

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu for an accessible version of this report.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Sugary Drink Excise Tax Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; November 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Dar Alon, Banapsha Rahman, Ya Xuan Sun, Amy Bolton, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

← Back to Resources