CHOICES Map

Sectors

Illinois Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In early 2017, Illinois’ Senate budget plan included a proposal to tax sugary drinks, but it was removed from subsequent versions of the plan. Illinois was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if the state moved forward and adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In April 2017, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax in Illinois. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent tens of thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 116,000 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $37.70 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Chicago TribuneIllinois soda tax could cut health costs, raise $561 million in revenue annually

Seattle Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In April 2017, Mayor Ed Murray proposed to Seattle’s City Council a 1.75-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages in Seattle to help raise money for much-needed programs in the city to promote healthy eating, especially among low-income communities.

Findings

In May 2017, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of Seattle’s proposed 1.75-cent per-ounce sugar-sweetened and diet beverage tax. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 3,170 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $48.60 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Progressive GrocerSugary Drink Tax Good for Health Care Costs, Public Health: Study

In June 2017, the Seattle City Council in a 7.1 vote passed a 1.75-cent-per-ounce excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages, but diet drinks were exempted.

San Jose Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

San Jose was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in San Jose in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in San Jose would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 5,200 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $27.50 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 164 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

San Diego Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

San Diego was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in San Diego in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in San Diego would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 7,100 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $27.20 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 241 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Phoenix Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Phoenix was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Phoenix in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Phoenix would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 13,510 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $35.80 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 496 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Oklahoma City Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Oklahoma City was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Oklahoma City in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Oklahoma City would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 4,590 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $24.80 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 197 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Louisville Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Louisville was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Louisville in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Louisville would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 6,793 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $52.10 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 448 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Los Angeles Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Los Angeles was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Los Angeles in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Los Angeles would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 21,700 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $28.20 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 779 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Las Vegas Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Las Vegas was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Las Vegas in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Las Vegas would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 4,678 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $26.30 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 170 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Las Vegas Review Journal: Las Vegas could gain $25.2M in revenue from soda tax, report says

Jacksonville Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Jacksonville was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Jacksonville in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Jacksonville would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 7,300 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $34.84 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 394 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Jacksonville CBS affiliate: Tax on soda? Jacksonville organization pushes the proposed legislation
WJCT (Jacksonville NPR affiliate):
12/22/2016: Year In Review Media Roundtable; Soda Tax

 

 

Indianapolis Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Indianapolis was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Indianapolis in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Indianapolis would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 7,710 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $36.80 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 393 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

WFYI (Indianapolis NPR affiliate): Could A Tax On Sugary Drinks Really Help Save Lives?

Detroit Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Detroit was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Detroit in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Detroit would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 7,200 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $29.50 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 350 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Denver Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Denver was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Denver in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Denver would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 5,120 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $36.40 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 169 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Columbus Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Columbus was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Columbus in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Columbus would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 7,690 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $37.80 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 396 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Charlotte Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Charlotte was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Charlotte in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Charlotte would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 7,140 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $30.60 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 273 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

Baltimore Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

Baltimore was modeled as part of an effort CHOICES led in partnership with Healthy Food America that examined what the impact would be if 15 of the country’s largest cities adopted a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax.

Findings

In December 2016, CHOICES released a report examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax in Baltimore in addition to 14 other big U.S. cities. CHOICES analysis found that the tax in Baltimore would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 4,950 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $31.70 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)
  • 303 cases of diabetes prevented once the tax reaches its full effect (over one year)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Baltimore Sun: Harvard study says soda tax would have health benefit if implemented in Baltimore

Cook County Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In October 2016, the Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle proposed a one-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Cook County, Illinois to help close a 2017 budget shortfall. This tax would benefit 5.26 million people in the first year.

Findings

In November 2016, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of Cook County’s proposed one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened and diet beverage tax. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 37,000 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $25.80 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Huffington Post: Soda Is About To Get Pricier For Another 5 Million Americans – November 11, 2016

In November 2016, the Cook County Board of Commissioners in a 9-8 vote passed a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened and diet beverage tax.

Philadelphia Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies

Context

Philadelphia is a CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership location applying cost-effectiveness analysis to current or proposed childhood obesity prevention interventions. Philadelphia will use the results to inform decision making, strategic planning, and potential implementation of the interventions.

Strategies of Interest

In partnership with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health Division of Chronic Disease Prevention, CHOICES is analyzing the impact and cost-effectiveness of interventions to improve the health of children in school and early care settings.

New Hampshire State Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies

Context

New Hampshire is a CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership location applying cost-effectiveness analysis to current or proposed childhood obesity prevention interventions. New Hampshire will use the results to inform decision making, strategic planning, and potential implementation of the interventions.

Strategies of Interest

In partnership with the New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services, CHOICES is analyzing the impact and cost-effectiveness of interventions in the community and government sector that would improve dietary intake and interventions to improve the nutrition and physical activity in early care settings.

Alaska State Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies

Context

Alaska is a CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership location applying cost-effectiveness analysis to current or proposed childhood obesity prevention interventions. Alaska will use the results to inform decision making, strategic planning, and potential implementation of the interventions.

Strategies of Interest

In partnership with the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, CHOICES is analyzing the impact and cost-effectiveness of interventions in the community and government sector to improve dietary intake.

Boulder Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In September 2016 the City Clerk Lynnette Beck put the question of a two-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on the ballot in Boulder. The tax revenues would be earmarked for administration of the tax and for health and wellness programs. City staff would produce an annual report of how the tax revenue is spent. This tax would benefit 97,600 people in the first year.

Findings

In October 2016, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of Boulder’s proposed two-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent hundreds of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 938 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $42.20 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Business Insider: A new study says soda taxes could save millions of dollars in healthcare costs — and that should terrify Coke and Pepsi – October 27, 2016
Bloomberg: On the Ballot Nov. 8: Clinton, Trump, Obesity, and Coke – October 28, 2016
Forbes: Bay Area And Boulder Soda Taxes Would Save Lives, Lower Healthcare Costs, Says Harvard – October 27, 2016

On November 8th, 2016, the electorate in Boulder voted in a 54 to 46 percent vote to pass a two-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax.

Albany Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In mid-2016, the Albany City Council put the question of a one-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on the ballot. The revenue would not be earmarked for any special purpose, but rather would require the City Council to hold an annual public process to consider how best to spend the funds raised by the tax. This tax would benefit 19,100 people in the first year.

Findings

In October 2016, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of Albany’s proposed one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent almost 100 cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 92 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $25.80 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Business Insider: A new study says soda taxes could save millions of dollars in healthcare costs — and that should terrify Coke and Pepsi – October 27, 2016

Bloomberg: On the Ballot Nov. 8: Clinton, Trump, Obesity, and Coke – October 28, 2016

Forbes: Bay Area And Boulder Soda Taxes Would Save Lives, Lower Healthcare Costs, Says Harvard – October 27, 2016

On November 8th, 2016, the electorate in Albany voted 71 to 28 percent vote to pass a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax.

Oakland Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In mid-2016, the Oakland City Council agreed unanimously to put the question of a one-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on the ballot in Oakland. The revenue raised would go into the city’s general fund, and then earmarked to pay for health and education programs in the community and in schools. The measure requires the city to create an advisory board to recommend how to spend the money. This tax would benefit 397,000 people in the first year.

Findings

In October 2016, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of Oakland’s proposed one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 2,140 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $30.40 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Business Insider: A new study says soda taxes could save millions of dollars in healthcare costs — and that should terrify Coke and Pepsi – October 27, 2016

Bloomberg: On the Ballot Nov. 8: Clinton, Trump, Obesity, and Coke – October 28, 2016

Forbes: Bay Area And Boulder Soda Taxes Would Save Lives, Lower Healthcare Costs, Says Harvard – October 27, 2016


On November 8th, 2016, the electorate in Oakland voted in a 61 to 39 percent vote to pass a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax.

San Francisco Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In mid-2016 City Supervisor Malia Cohen put the question of a one-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on the ballot in San Francisco. The revenue would not be earmarked for any special purpose, but rather would go into the city’s general fund with an advisory panel set up to suggest ways to promote the dangers of heavy sugar consumption. This tax would benefit 801,000 people in the first year.

Findings

In October 2016, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of San Francisco’s proposed one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 3,750 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $30.50 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Business Insider: A new study says soda taxes could save millions of dollars in healthcare costs — and that should terrify Coke and Pepsi – October 27, 2016

Bloomberg: On the Ballot Nov. 8: Clinton, Trump, Obesity, and Coke – October 28, 2016

Forbes: Bay Area And Boulder Soda Taxes Would Save Lives, Lower Healthcare Costs, Says Harvard – October 27, 2016

On November 8th, 2016, the electorate in San Francisco voted 62 to 38 percent vote to pass a one-cent-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax.

Philadelphia Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax

Context

In early 2016, Mayor Jim Kenney proposed to the City Council a three-cents-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages in Philadelphia to help raise money for much-needed services in the city such as universal pre-K and public parks. This tax would benefit 1.54 million people in the first year.

Findings

In April 2016, CHOICES released a brief examining the cost-effectiveness and impact of Philadelphia’s proposed three-cents-per-ounce sugar-sweetened beverage tax. CHOICES analysis found that the tax would prevent thousands of cases of childhood and adult obesity, prevent new cases of diabetes, increase the number of healthy years lived by residents, and save more in future healthcare costs than it would cost to implement. Results include:

  • 36,000 cases of obesity prevented in 2025
  • $84.05 in health care costs saved per $1 invested (over 10 years)

Recent Developments

CHOICES analysis and results in the media:

Philadelphia Inquirer: Harvard study: Soda tax would make Phila. Healthier April 28, 2016

PhillyVoice.com: Harvard study: Philly’s soda tax would save $197 million in health-care costs April 28, 2016

Forbes: Philadelphia Sugary Drink Tax Would Significantly Reduce Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, Says Study- April 28, 2016

In June 2016, the Philadelphia City Council in a 13-4 vote passed a 1.5-cent-per-ounce excise tax, making Philadelphia the first major U.S. city to adopt a tax on sugary and diet drinks.

Mississippi State Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies

Context

Mississippi is a CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership location that applied cost-effectiveness analysis to current or proposed childhood obesity prevention interventions. Mississippi is using the results to inform decision making, strategic planning, and potential implementation of the interventions.

In partnership with the Mississippi State Department of Health, CHOICES analyzed the impact and cost-effectiveness of:

Strategies of Interest

  • Early Care and Education Screen Time – implement a statewide regulation to ensure screen time is limited to 30 minutes/week in licensed child care facilities; offer training for child care providers in an educational program to support families in reducing screen time
  • Active PE – implement a statewide regulation requiring that 50% of physical education (PE) time be devoted to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in elementary and middle schools
  • Mind, Exercise, Nutrition…Do it! – MEND – offer clinical group counseling for children with obesity who are enrolled in Medicaid and their caregivers

Recent Developments

After Mississippi completed its collaboration with CHOICES, a representative of Mississippi’s Department of Health commented on how cost-effectiveness analysis can inform decision making:

“In planning activities, now I’m thinking about ‘is this the most cost-effective way to use our resources?’ And could we be using it in a different way?’ Would this activity be more beneficial than the other…versus what we’ve been doing before?”

Tiffani Grant, Director, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity,
Office of Preventive Health, Mississippi State Department of Health

West Virginia State Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies

Context

West Virginia is a CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership location that applied cost-effectiveness analysis to current or proposed childhood obesity prevention interventions. West Virginia is using the results to inform decision making, strategic planning, and potential implementation of the interventions.

In partnership with the West Virginia Bureau for Public Health, CHOICES analyzed the impact and cost-effectiveness of:

Strategies of Interest

  •  Key 2 a Healthy Start – integrate the implementation of NAP SACC–early care and education (ECE) nutrition, physical activity, and screen time practices–into the reimbursement system for child care, which provides larger subsidies to programs that meet higher standards of care
  • Sugary Drink Tax – increase volume-based state excise tax on sugary drinks to either $0.01 per ounce or $0.02 per ounce
  • Healthy Beverage Standards for SNAP – request to USDA to remove sugary drinks from the list of beverages that can be purchased with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits

Recent Developments

After West Virginia completed its collaboration with CHOICES, a representative of the West Virginia Bureau for Public Health described the benefits of cost-effectiveness data:

“It has been a wonderful opportunity to be able to insert data and metrics into state health improvement plans. It’s important because it serves the larger purpose and goal of not just being able to make a case to the policymakers, but also demonstrate that we’re having data and evidence guide our policy making.”

– Dr. Rahul Gupta, Commissioner, West Virginia Bureau for Public Health

Washington State Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies

Context

Washington is a CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership location that applied cost-effectiveness analysis to current or proposed childhood obesity prevention interventions. Now Washington is using the results to inform decision making, strategic planning, and potential implementation of the interventions.

Strategies of Interest

  • NAP SACC in Early Achievers – integrate NAP SACC early care and education (ECE) nutrition, physical activity, and screen time practices into Early Achievers, the statewide quality rating improvement system for ECE programs
  • Active Recess – statewide support for school districts’ efforts by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to increase students’ activity levels during recess time by incorporating playground markings, portable play equipment, and/or structured activities
  • Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax – implement volume-based state excise tax on sugary drinks at either $0.01 per ounce,$0.02 per ounce; or $0.05 per ounce tax

Recent Developments

After Washington completed its collaboration with CHOICES, a representative of Washington’s Department of Public Health stressed the benefits of learning about the cost-effectiveness of the sugar-sweetened beverage tax intervention-

For us there are many health issues where as a state we don’t look so bad. Then you start peeling back the information and looking at it from a geographic stand point, from a health equity standpoint and you realize that we’ve got some significant problems that need to be addressed. That all supports a tailoring of the interventions specific to that population and their situation. This kind of work [with CHOICES] really fits with that approach to getting better and better at understanding the exact health impacts within our state and how to program resources very specifically to try to improve those impacts.”

Janna Bardi, Assistant Secretary for Prevention and Community Health, Washington State Department of Health. 

Oklahoma State Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies

Context

Oklahoma is a CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership location applying cost-effectiveness analysis to current or proposed childhood obesity prevention interventions. Oklahoma will use the results to inform decision making, strategic planning, and potential implementation of the interventions.

Strategies of Interest

In partnership with the Oklahoma State Department of Health, CHOICES is analyzing the impact and cost-effectiveness of interventions that would improve the health of children ages 2-5 in the early care and community/government sectors.