Topic: Unhealthy Food & Beverage Marketing

Strategy Report: Creating Healthier Early Care and Education Environments

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu with any accessibility questions.

Suggested Citation

Barrett JL, Bolton AA, Gortmaker SL, Cradock AL. CHOICES National Action Kit: Creating Healthier Early Care and Education Environments Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Dar Alon, Stella Zhu, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Stephanie McCulloch, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Policy to Reduce TV Time in Early Care and Education Settings

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu with any accessibility questions.

Suggested Citation

Barrett JL, Bolton AA, Gortmaker SL, Cradock AL. CHOICES National Action Kit: Policy to Reduce TV Time in Early Care and Education Settings Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Banapsha Rahman, Ya Xuan Sun, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Stephanie McCulloch, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Home Visits to Reduce TV Time

Mom and daughter meeting with counselor at home, while daughter is looking at a handheld screen

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu with any accessibility questions.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Home Visits to Reduce TV Time Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Banapsha Rahman, Ya Xuan Sun, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Program in Early Care and Education Settings to Reduce TV Viewing

Teacher playing with kids

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu with any accessibility questions.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Program in Early Care and Education Settings to Reduce TV Viewing Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; November 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Banapsha Rahman, Ya Xuan Sun, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Reducing Exposure to Unhealthy Food and Beverage Advertising

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu with any accessibility questions.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Reducing Exposure to Unhealthy Food and Beverage Advertising Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; November 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Banapsha Rahman, Ya Xuan Sun, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

← Back to Resources

Strategy Report: Creating Healthier Afterschool Environments

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu with any accessibility questions.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Creating Healthier Afterschool Environments Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; November 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Dar Alon, Stella Zhu, Shilpi Agarwal, Ana Paula Bonner Septien, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Strategy Report: Counseling in WIC Visits to Reduce TV Viewing

Mom and daughter meeting with counselor at home, while daughter is looking at a handheld screen

The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose.

Overview

CHOICES uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and outcomes of different policies and programs promoting improved nutrition or increased physical activity in schools, early care and education and out-of-school settings, communities, and clinics. This strategy report describes the projected national population reach, impact on health and health equity, implementation costs, and cost-effectiveness for an effective strategy to improve child health. This information can help inform decision-making around promoting healthy weight. To explore and compare additional strategies, visit the CHOICES National Action Kit 2.0.

Continue reading in the full report.

Contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu with any accessibility questions.

Suggested Citation

CHOICES National Action Kit: Counseling in WIC Visits to Reduce TV Viewing Strategy Report. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; November 2023.

Acknowledgments

We thank the following members of the CHOICES Project team for their contributions: Molly Garrone, Banapsha Rahman, Ya Xuan Sun, Amy Bolton, Jenny Reiner, Matt Lee, Zach Ward.

Funding

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01HL146625), The JPB Foundation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders. The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose

For further information, contact choicesproject@hsph.harvard.edu

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Coffee Chat: An Action Kit for Prevention: Prioritizing Cost-Effective and Equitable Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Strategies

In this coffee chat hosted by the CHOICES Community of Practice, Dr. Steven Gortmaker, Principal Investigator of the CHOICES Project at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, highlights the new features available in the Action Kit 2.0, including more detailed information on costs and health equity impacts. Dr. Gortmaker also discusses how this information can be helpful for planning and prioritization purposes to ensure responsible investments to improve child health, nutrition, physical activity, and health equity.

View the resource round-up from this coffee chat

Download the November 2023 coffee chat presentation slides

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Strategy Profile: Policy to Reduce TV Time in Early Care and Education Settings

The information in this resource is intended only to provide educational information. This profile describes the estimated benefits, activities, resources, and leadership needed to implement a strategy to improve child health. This information can be useful for planning and prioritization purposes.

  • Policy to limit noneducational television time in licensed early care and education (ECE) programs to 30 minutes per week for young children ages 2-5.

What population benefits?

Children ages 2-5 who attend licensed early care and education programs.

What are the estimated benefits?

Relative to not implementing the strategy
Reduce child daily television time which can help promote healthy child weight.

What activities and resources are needed?

Activities Resources Who Leads?
Assess compliance with new policy to limit television time to no more than 30 minutes per week • Time for state licensor to assess compliance with new policy during monitoring visit
• Time for early care and education directors to participate in monitoring visit
State early care and education licensing agency
Provide materials and equipment for promoting physical activity (such as CDs with activity-promoting music and templates for parent newsletters) • Time for state licensor to provide technical assistance related to policy to limit television time
• Time for early care and education directors to receive technical assistance related to policy
State early care and education licensing agency
Produce educational materials about new policy for early care and education directors • Cost of educational materials State early care and education licensing agency
Strategy Modification

This strategy could be implemented at the state or local level through different mechanisms, including as a requirement for early care and education (ECE) programs participating in a state’s Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) or as best practice recommendations for ECE providers issued by a local health department or via a resolution from a local board of health, alone or in combination with other health-related objectives. Using these mechanisms, the impact on health and the activities and resources needed to carry out the television time policy are expected to be similar, however the cost and reach may vary.


FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Kenney EL, Mozaffarian RS, Long MW, Barrett JL, Cradock AL, Giles CM, Ward ZJ, Gortmaker SL. Limiting television to reduce childhood obesity: cost-effectiveness of five population strategies. Child Obes. 2021 Oct;17(7):442-448. doi: 10.1089/chi.2021.0016.

Selected CHOICES research brief including cost-effectiveness metrics:

Grant T, Wiggins C, Shelson S, Cradock AL, Gortmaker SL, Pipito A, Kenney EL, Giles CM. Mississippi: State Regulations to Reduce Non-Educational Screen Time for Young Children in Licensed Care {Issue Brief}. Mississippi State Department of Health, Jackson, MS, and the CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; April, 2017. Available at: https://choicesproject.org/publications/brief-state-regulations-screen-time-mississippi

Case S, Simpson K, Khan F, U’ren S, Giles C, Kenney EL, Flax CN, Gortmaker SL, Ward ZJ, Cradock AL. Oklahoma: Updated Requirements in Reaching for the Stars to Reduce Non-Educational Screen Time for Young Children in Family Child Care Homes {Issue Brief}. Oklahoma State Department of Health and Oklahoma State Department of Human Services, Oklahoma City, OK, and the CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; October 2017. Available at: https://choicesproject.org/publications/brief-ece-screen-time-oklahoma

Pharis M, Lawman H, Root M, Dryden S, Wagner A, Bettigole C, Mozaffarian, RS, Kenney EL, Cradock AL, Gortmaker SL, Giles CM, Ward ZJ. Philadelphia, PA: Childcare Policies Can Build a Better Future {Issue Brief}. Philadelphia Department of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA, and the CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2017. Available at: https://choicesproject.org/publications/brief-screen-time-philadelphia

Hill AB, Mozaffarian RS, Barrett JL, Cradock AL. Detroit: Best Practice Guidelines for Healthy Childcare {Issue Brief}. Detroit Health Department and United Way for Southeastern Michigan, Detroit, MI, and the CHOICES Learning Collaborative Partnership at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; December 2019. Available at: https://choicesproject.org/publications/brief-ece-detroit


Suggested Citation

CHOICES Strategy Profile: Policy to Reduce TV Time in Early Care and Education Settings. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; September 2023.

Funding

This work is supported by The JPB Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose. The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders.

Adapted from the TIDieR (Template for Intervention Description and Replication) Checklist

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Strategy Profile: Program in Early Care and Education Settings to Reduce TV Viewing

The information in this resource is intended only to provide educational information. This profile describes the estimated benefits, activities, resources, and leadership needed to implement a strategy to improve child health. This information can be useful for planning and prioritization purposes.

  • Program to reduce television viewing among young children ages 2-5 in licensed early care and education centers by training educators in an evidence-based curriculum and engaging families in reducing television time at home

What population benefits?

Children ages 2-5 attending licensed early care and education centers.

What are the estimated benefits?

Relative to not implementing the strategy
Reduce child daily television time which can help promote healthy child weight.

What activities and resources are needed?

Activities Resources Who Leads?
Train early care and education directors and staff on an evidence-based curriculum (Fit5Kids) to reduce television time • Time for state early care and education agency training consultant to prepare for and lead trainings
• Time for early care and education program directors and staff to attend trainings
• Travel costs
State early care and education training consultant
Provide training materials for early care educators and administrators to engage children and families in reducing television time • Cost of training materials State government
Provide materials to children and families to promote reduced TV time • Cost of materials for children and families
• Cost of the book “The Berenstain Bears and Too Much TV”
Early care and education programs

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Kenney EL, Mozaffarian RS, Long MW, Barrett JL, Cradock AL, Giles CM, Ward ZJ, Gortmaker SL. Limiting television to reduce childhood obesity: cost-effectiveness of five population strategies. Child Obes. 2021 Oct;17(7):442-448. doi: 10.1089/ chi.2021.0016.


Suggested Citation

CHOICES Strategy Profile: Program in Early Care and Education Settings to Reduce TV Viewing. CHOICES Project Team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; September 2023

Funding

This work is supported by The JPB Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48DP006376). The information provided here is intended to be used for educational purposes. Links to other resources and websites are intended to provide additional information aligned with this educational purpose. The findings and conclusions are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or other funders.

Adapted from the TIDieR (Template for Intervention Description and Replication) Checklist

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